Our November 2020 issue features special sections on primate and carnivore conservation. The accompanying Briefly spotlight and the Editorial by Anthony Rylands et al. focus on latest conservation updates on primates, including articles on gibbons, lemurs, orangutans and others!

Find out more about this issue’s contents, including our Editor’s picks, below:

Primate conservation

  • New estimates of orangutan density in Sungai Palin watershed, Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan, Indonesia – Yanuar et al.
  • Identifying priority areas for the conservation of the Critically Endangered northern white-cheeked gibbon Nomascus leucogenys in northern Lao – Syxaiyakhamthor et al.
  • Transboundary conservation of the last remaining population of the cao vit gibbon Nomascus nasutusMa et al.
  • Using occupancy-based camera-trap surveys to assess the Critically Endangered primate Macaca nigra across its range in North Sulawesi, Indonesia – Johnson et al. (see blog post)
  • Potential distribution of and priority conservation areas for the Endangered Caatinga howler monkey Alouatta ululata in north-eastern Brazil – Freire Filho & Palmeirim
  • Habitat suitability for primate conservation in north-east Brazil – Moraes et al. (see blog post)
  • First record of the Peruvian yellow-tailed woolly monkey Lagothrix flavicauda in the Región Junín, Peru – McHugh et al. (see blog post)
  • Range and conservation updates for the Critically Endangered blue-eyed black lemur Eulemur flavifrons and the Vulnerable black lemur Eulemur macacoTinsman et al.

Left: A sub-adult (right) and an adult female (left) Bearded capuchin monkey. Right: Female and an infant Bearded capuchin monkey. Photos: Monique Bastos. Read Moraes’ blog post ‘Red alert for primates in north-east Brazil’ here.

Carnivore conservation

  • Effects of habitat alteration and disturbance by humans & and exotic species on fosa Cryptoprocta ferox occupancy in Madagascar’s deciduous forests – Merson et al.
  • Spatial dynamics and activity patterns of the fosa Cryptoprocta ferox in Ankarafantsika National Park, Madagascar: carnivores navigating a human-influenced landscape – Wyza et al. (see blog post)
  • Corridors of tolerance through human-dominated landscapes facilitate dispersal and connectivity between populations of African lions Panthera leo Dolrenry et al. (see blog post)
  • Updated ranges of the Vulnerable cheetah and Endangered African wild dog in Angola – Monterroso et al. (see blog post)
  • Priority areas for jaguar Panthera onca conservation in the Cerrado – Portugal et al.
  • Factors influencing local attitudes towards the conservation of leopard cats Prionailurus bengalensis in rural Taiwan – Best & Pei
  • Conservation status of the dhole Cuon alpinus in northeast India, with a focus on Dampa Tiger Reserve, Mizoram – Singh et al. (see blog post)
  • New insights into Sulawesi’s apex predator: the Sulawesi civet Macrogalidia musschenbroekiiHunowu et al. (see blog post)

Behind the cover

Monitoring populations of conservation concern is much improved if baseline data are available. This is of particular importance for Critically Endangered taxa such as the Bornean orangutan. A survey of orangutan nests in the peat-swamp forests of the Sungai Palin watershed, of the upper Kapuas river, West Kalimantan, Indonesia, has estimated the density of this subspecies in the unprotected area of Sungai Palin and compared this to data from the nearby area of Nanga Awen, which was surveyed in 1991. For further details, read the full article here. (Photograph © Ondrej Chvatal/Shutterstock)

Editorial Primate conservation—new reports from the field by Rylands et al.

‘The eight articles in this issue of Oryx present an array of research initiatives encompassing 11 primates, all threatened. They focus on field surveys, but with objectives and methods suited to the particularities of the status, distribution and habitats of each species.’

Left: The crested black macaque is a diurnal primate that lives in large, male dominant, multi-male, multi-female social groups that can contain up to 100 individuals. Right: Eighty per cent of the crested black macaques occupied range is outside protected areas, where forest loss and other threats are more prevalent. Therefore, although protected areas are very important, conservation efforts must consider areas that have no official protected status. Photos: Andrew Walmsley. Read Johnson’s blog post ‘Don’t be camera shy: camera traps in the fight against primate declines’ here.

Editor’s picks

  • Transboundary conservation of the last remaining population of the cao vit gibbon Nomascus nasutus Ma et al.
  • Spatial dynamics and activity patterns of the fosa Cryptoprocta ferox in Ankarafantsika National Park, Madagascar: carnivores navigating a human-influenced landscape Wyza et al. (see blog post)
  • Corridors of tolerance through human-dominated landscapes facilitate dispersal and connectivity between populations of African lions Panthera leo Dolrenry et al. (see blog post)
  • Camera trapping reveals a diverse and unique high-elevation mammal community under threat Huarcaya et al. (see blog post)

Collared fosa. Photo: Eileen Wyza. Read Wyza’s blog post ‘The secret life of Madagascar’s largest carnivore in a vanishing forest’ here.

Conservation News

  • Conservation Leadership Programme celebrates landmark USD 10 million in project funding awarded – Tointon
  • A new action plan developed for the Cape parrot and its habitat – Leaver et al.
  • Last chance to prevent the extinction of the Chinese pangolin – Hua et al.
  • Critically Endangered subpopulation of Irrawaddy dolphin in central Philippines may lose its habitat to large-scale development project – Tiongson et al.
  • First steps towards conservation of the Endangered blonde capuchin monkey Sapajus flavius in the Caatinga dry forest, Brazil – Garcia et al.

Acknowledgements

The Oryx Editorial team thanks all of our dedicated reviewers: your time and effort enables Oryx to continue to deliver high quality content to advance conservation. For a list of reviewers from the past year, see here.



Emma started her role as Editorial Assistant at Oryx in 2018, having previously completed a BSc in Geography at the University of Sussex and an MSc in Conservation Science at Imperial College London. She has a keen interest in marine conservation and has experience working on sea turtle, coral reef, and tropical fish monitoring projects. Her previous research includes an ethological study on the impact of human enrichment on the welfare of captive giant Pacific octopus, and an investigation into the barriers to increased conservation involvement in European zoos.